CONFRONTING INFERTILITY IN AMERICA

Margaret Marsh, University Professor of History
Margaret Marsh and Wanda Ronner, her sister and long-time co-author, have received one of eight awards through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program, which challenges investigators to tackle major policy issues facing the United States. The award will provide funding to support their research project “Infertility and Assisted Reproduction from the Development of in vitro Fertilization to the Present — Medicine, Culture, Policy, and Practice.”
 


BREAKING GROUND, BREAKING SILENCE

Keith Green, Associate Professor of English
Keith Green has written a groundbreaking text which explores the more than 6,000 surviving slave narratives in existence. In the forthcoming Bound to Respect: Antebellum Narratives of Imprisonment, Servitude and Captivity, 1816 to 1861, Green’s comprehensive focus illustrates how the word “slavery” insufficiently explains the various forms of suffering that people of African descent were enduring in the New World. Examining firsthand and dictated accounts, the text explores distinct forms of black bondage and confinement in the 19th century, such as enslavement by Native Americans, Barbary captivity, state imprisonment, and child indentured servitude. More than half the book includes previously undocumented research, contributing to a more thorough understanding of what blacks, both enslaved and free, endured. While the book isn’t due out until early 2015, the Rutgers-Camden scholar already is garnering literary praise. His manuscript has been awarded the Elizabeth Agee Prize in American Literature from the editorial board of the University of Alabama Press.
 


TAKING THE LEAD IN JUVENILE JUSTICE REFORM

Sandra Simkins, Clinical Professor of Law
The U.S. Department of Justice has called on Sandra Simkins, a clinical professor of law, to serve as a due process monitor in an unprecedented effort to reform the juvenile court in Shelby County, Tennessee. Author of the book When Kids Get Arrested, What Every Adult Should Know (Rutgers University Press, 2009), Simkins serves as one of three monitors to report back on progress of this historic effort. Simkins’ leadership in juvenile justice was also recognized by the National Juvenile Defender Center, which presented her with the Robert E. Shepherd Award for Excellence in Juvenile Defense.
 


EXCELLENCE IN INNOVATION, NATIONALLY CITED

Michael Carrier, Distinguished Professor of Law
A leading authority in antitrust, copyright, patent, and innovation law, Michael Carrier is quoted regularly in national media outlets, including the American Lawyer, Chicago Tribune, Forbes, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, NPR’s Marketplace, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. A 2013 U.S. Supreme Court opinion in a case addressing pharmaceutical antitrust law cited Carrier’s amicus brief, and his scholarship has also been cited by several federal appellate courts in the past year. In July of this year, Carrier testified before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee (Subcommittee on Antitrust Competition Policy and Consumer Rights) in the “Pay-for-Delay Deals: Limiting Competition and Costing Consumers” hearing.
 

Faculty Highlight

Janice Beitz was part of a research team that developed the ostomy algorithm, a step-by-step aid that allows nurses to properly assess ostomy patients and their needs.
Meet the New Faculty

Rutgers–Camden welcomes 27 new scholars this fall