Poetry Reading to Address Racial Injustice

Rutgers University–Camden will host a compelling poetry reading addressing racial injustice at 12:15 p.m. Monday, March 31.

Poet, author and political activist Ewuare Osayande will recite a selection of poems from the anthology Stand Our Ground, Poems for Trayvon Martin and Marissa Alexander.

The event, which is free and open to the general public, will be held in the West ABC Conference Room, on the lower level of the Campus Center.

Osayande will recite poems speaking out against racial inequities, such as Jim Crow justice, lynchings, and the murder of Emmett Till in 1955. Poets included in the anthology are Sonia Sanchez, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, and Askia Toure. Recitations will be interspersed with political commentary on the subject matter.

“This event draws attention to the continuing struggle against racial injustice, typified by the cases of Trayvon Martin, Marissa Alexander, Oscar Grant, Jordan Davis, and so many others,” says Wayne Glasker, an associate professor of history at Rutgers–Camden, who organized the event. “Racial stereotypes, racial profiling, and a malevolent double-standard of justice persist in the present just as they did in the past.”

A prolific author, Osayande has written 14 books, including most recently a collection of essays Misogyny and the Emcee: Sex, Race and Hip Hop, and a poetry book Blood Luxury.

Tom McLaughlin
Rutgers University–Camden
Editorial/Media Specialist
(856) 225-6545
thomas.mclaughlin@camden.rutgers.edu

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