Lecture to Examine Parents’ Choices for Neighborhoods and Schools

The Center for Urban Research and Education (CURE) at Rutgers University–Camden will offer a free lecture exploring how parents decide where to live and send their children to school at 12:15 p.m. Thursday, May 8.

Annette Lareau, the Stanley I. Sheerr term professor in the social sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, and Kim Goyette, an associate professor of sociology at Temple University, will present a lecture titled “Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools: New Research on How Parents Think about Key Life Decisions.” Following the lecture, the book, Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools, a new edited volume by Lareau and Goyette, will be available to purchase and for them to sign.

The talk, which is free of charge and open to the public, will be held in the faculty lounge on the third floor of Armitage Hall. No registration is required. For further information, contact CURE Associate Director Natasha Tursi at ntursi@camden.rutgers.edu or 856-225-6797.

Lareau and Goyette will explain how a series of policy shifts over the past decade promise to change how Americans decide where to send their children to school. According to the researchers, in theory, the expanded use of standardized test scores and the boom in charter schools will allow parents to evaluate their assigned neighborhood school, or move in search of a better option. They will investigate the data that parents actually use to choose schools, whether there are differences among suburban and urban families, and whether parents’ choices influence school and residential segregation.

Lareau and Goyette will touch on chapters in Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools, which present a breakthrough analysis of the new era of school choice, and what it portends for American neighborhoods. The distinguished contributors will explore the complex relationships among education, neighborhood social networks, and larger patterns of inequality.

Founded in 2001, the Center for Urban Research and Education at Rutgers–Camden aims to encourage, facilitate, and promote research on urban issues by Rutgers-Camden faculty and their collaborators around the nation. The research center’s monthly seminars, held in conjunction with Rutgers–Camden’s Office of Civic Engagement, provide members and affiliates with opportunities to learn about cutting-edge research and initiatives from scholars, community activists, and others engaged in urban research and/or urban change.

Parking in Rutgers–Camden lots is by permit only. Visitors to Rutgers–Camden must obtain a temporary permit to park in a lot from 8 a.m. Mondays through 5 p.m. Fridays. For parking information, contact the Office of Parking at 856-225-6137.

Tom McLaughlin
Rutgers University–Camden
Editorial/Media Specialist
(856) 225-6545
thomas.mclaughlin@camden.rutgers.edu

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