Business Scholars Advise Doctoral Students at South Africa Consortium

CAMDEN — The role emerging markets play in the global economy is an important one that business scholars and students continue to study.

This summer, faculty members from the Rutgers School of Business–Camden were on hand to help doctoral students from around the world advance their understanding of issues that arise in those markets during a meeting of the Emerging Markets Conference Board in South Africa.

The annual conference, held June 17-20 at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth, began with a doctoral consortium for about 20 fellows from Africa, China, England, and India, among many other countries.

“The purpose of any doctoral consortium is to bring doctoral students to a gathering place so they can meet seasoned faculty to get more guidance and support about academic life,” says Julie Ruth, a professor of marketing at Rutgers–Camden. “The consortium served as a way for these students to make connections with scholars from around the world so we could become collaborators with them, either formally or informally.”

Ruth and Rutgers–Camden business Dean Jaishankar Ganesh joined 10 other business professors serving as faculty members during the doctoral consortium. While there, they provided the fellows with insight on doctoral research and served as expert sources on a wide range of research topics.

“This consortium served as a way to help the next generation of professors and scholars become better equipped to generate new knowledge,” Ruth says. “If these doctoral students can extend their network and know that they have resources to call on to help them in their work, it can be a huge advantage in accelerating their scholarly abilities and their own vision of what they can become as faculty members and scholars.”

A two-day conference focusing on emerging markets research followed the consortium. Ruth joined Rutgers–Camden marketing professors Carol Kaufman-Scarborough and Yuliya Strizhakova as track co-chairs for the conference.

Ganesh says the participation in the conference and the consortium serves as an expansion of Rutgers–Camden’s relationship with South Africa.

Rutgers–Camden’s signature spring break program is to South Africa. This year marked the 18th year Rutgers–Camden students and faculty set out to explore historic Cape Town and Johannesburg. More than 70 business, law, nursing, political science, and urban studies students shared in cultural and academic experiences during the annual trip.

“Coupled with our students’ service learning efforts in South Africa, this most recent collaboration between our business school and the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University is a natural progression that builds on our long-term involvement with South Africa,” Ganesh says.

Ed Moorhouse
856-225-6759

 

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